I don't understand why people often don't date/marry partners of the same race.There are different groups of people from different backgrounds for a reason.This is not a racist question, but I'd like to learn more by hearing other people's opinions. I don't understand why people often don't date/marry partners of the same race.

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But this comment just contributes to the prejudice that many minority groups face, instilling passive fear rather than any kind of active empowerment.

Are interracial couples seriously supposed to choose not to procreate because life might get tough for their kids? This question hints at some kind of self-loathing, especially for people of color with a white partner.

It’s true that exclusionary racial preferences can be racist and that there’s a lot of racist myths that make dating hard for people from certain ethnic backgrounds.

But we shouldn’t mistake those changing attitudes as evidence that we’re living a post-racial society.

Interracial couples themselves frequently hear racist remarks from strangers, family members, and friends.

That vote of confidence might seem like a compliment on the surface, but it’s rooted in valuing and fetishizing a combination of exotic and, in many cases, Caucasian features that is assumed to be *just right.* It’s best to stay away from presumptuous blanket statements like this in general.

People can be overly concerned about the hardship your children will allegedly have to endure.

(I'm mixed lol so hopefully nobody takes this question the wrong way)I don't understand why people often don't date/marry partners of the same race.

And art is imitating life: In 2013, a record-high 12 percent of newlyweds married someone of a different race, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census data.

Previous studies from Pew have shown a growing acceptance of interracial marriage.

In 2014, 37 percent of Americans said having more people of different races marrying each other was a good thing for society, which is an increase from 24 percent four years earlier.